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Cloud-Based Systems and Workforce Management Software: The Benefits

It is not surprising to have markets embracing cloud computing more readily today than a decade ago in order to boost their business performance and bottom line. Research has revealed that 90% of all new enterprises favor cloud-based systems which include inbuilt workforce management software when setting up their business ventures. This type of system and inbuilt software offers a smoother transition and scalability for improved mobile workforce scheduling operations.It is also noted that huge savings are enjoyed by a majority of cloud users with 62% readily reinvesting the savings into the business.Benefits for Start-UpsThe huge benefits that cloud computing bring about are also favorable to start-up businesses as well as medium to large businesses. Cloud-based systems allow many of these entrepreneurs to invest less capital on onsite technological resources and solutions.

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Start-up businesses are able to move progressively forward to embrace new technology elements such as the mobile devices and workforce scheduling software. With the progressive annual growth on cloud computing, this industry is expected to benefit all businesses with the widening circle of advanced features for mobile workforce scheduling.Cloud-based systems are suitable for handling mobile workforce schedules that would ensure greater effectiveness even for small to medium businesses. Hence, a small company that provides mobile workforce can be equipped with the right scheduling software and marketing strategies to increase efficiency without imposing on specialist skills or resources.Cloud computing has been proven for small businesses in terms of increased efficiency and better time management of mobile workforce and resources. Cloud services are suitable for many types of small businesses in a wide array of industries such as building constructions or education.Future PredictionsAs the technology progresses, it is expected that a wider scope of applications would emerge from cloud computing that would enhance the mobile workforce in more ways than one. It is predicted by various technological experts that cloud computing would see more hybrid clouds emerging with the number of Amazon competitors being reduced.

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It is expected that hybrid cloud management would be key in impacting mobile workforce scheduling with an explosion of cloud brokerage as well as integration hubs. Data will become more prominent with more advanced software that incorporates advanced features such as defined networking.There would be more options on hybrid cloud security with IAAS based services on the rise. This might lead to more frequent outages unless advanced technology brings on better solutions.A definite shift is experienced from the technology arena to the business sector with cloud based decisions made to enhance B2C services. Hence, mobile workforce scheduling can gain greater efficiency with the advanced management features to avoid low service standards.

The Ongoing Demographic Challenge: Bringing Boomer Managers and Generation Y Together

Generalizations about the various cohorts in the workplace today (Traditionalists, Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y) result in stereotypical views by each cohort of the members of the other cohorts. Understanding what defines each of these cohorts and their stereotypes will help members of these cohorts learn to work together more effectively by reducing the misunderstandings and conflict that arises. Demographic research tells us approximately 40% of the management and senior level positions in our organizations are held by Boomers and that currently 50% of the employees in the workforce are Boomers, so this stereotype is fairly well developed. As the decade progresses, this dominant cohort will be replaced by the next largest cohort, Generation Y, two workplace generations behind Boomers. This creates a workplace (defined as all places where work – profit and not for profit work is done) of misunderstanding and conflict if not addressed by organizational leaders.To further clarify the ongoing demographic challenge, let’s first look at the stereotypes.The Boomer Stereotype:
I am a member of the baby boomer cohort, those born between 1947 and 1966. This means I was raised during the 1950’s and 60’s and, in general terms, I am a member of the generation whose moral and political orientation (during their formative years) was significantly affected by the birth control pill and the Vietnam War.I entered the workforce as a highly educated professional during the 1980’s. I have held many management and leadership positions during the past thirty years and I love to work. I define myself by the work I do, hence; retirement is not in my immediate future.I was born into an affluent society – an abundant, healthy economy – where post secondary education was open to all those interested. I achieved two degrees and still, to this day, I like to see these degrees highlighted on my CV. I work to live and live to work so it makes perfect sense that my work defines me, my self worth and my view of others’ self worth. I expect others to have the same work ethic as I do.My working style is competitive so I am results-focused, I like to set goals and then action plans to achieve those goals. I expect to be rewarded for goal achievement and I am career driven, seeking regular promotions. My work defines me so, of course, I am very interested in job security.When it comes to my communication skills, I am considered a digital immigrant which means I had to learn email, internet, and social media on the job, as an adult. I prefer face to face communication but I have learned the value of digital discourse and accept it as part of the ongoing business experience.As I progress toward retirement, I am interested in continuing to live a results-oriented life with results focused around my personal goals – travel, health and wellness and, spending time with my grandchildren.Today, as I continue to function as a manager and leader in the workforce, my biggest challenge is the newest entrant – Generation Y or Milennials. Within less than a decade, my cohort will have decreased in size by 50% and Generation Y will have increased by 100%. They will become the dominant cohort in the workplace, replacing my cohort as the managers and business leaders for 2020 and beyond. And herein lies the ongoing demographic challenge.

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They are not like me!The Generation Y Stereotype:
Generation Y are members of the cohort born between 1980 and 1995. This means they were raised by baby boomer parents – parents who belong to the dominant societal cohort, a cohort that likes to spend well and live well. Generation Y has a close relationship with these boomer parents and will spend a significant part of their early adult years back at home with their parents. Their generational markers are defined by technology, specifically mobile technology and social media.They, like the boomers, have been born into an affluent society – an abundant, healthy economy – where post secondary education is open to all those interested. Most have achieved at least one degree, many have achieved more. But they do not define themselves by the work they do. The line between their personal and professional lives is blurred and their self-worth comes from how they are viewed by their friends and colleagues. They are collegial by nature and believe everyone is equal. They want a workplace where hard work and career aspiration translates into rapid advancement. They are loyal to their ‘community’ and they view work as part of the life continuum.If Boomers are digital immigrants then Generation Y are digital natives. These ‘sidewalk zombies’ (those who multitask by walking and texting at the same time unaware of what is going on around them on the street) have been raised with technology and, at a young age, had access to cellular technology. By the time they entered the workforce, they had graduated to smartphone technology – at home and at work. Their community is one of friends, many of whom they have never met. They need to be connected during all waking moments via social media – Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.Within less than a decade, this cohort will double and they will become the dominant cohort in the workplace. They will overshadow the working preferences, desires and needs of Generation X – the cohort sandwiched between Boomers and Generation Y and, unfortunately for them, a cohort half the size of both the Boomer and Generation Y cohorts – and herein lies the ongoing demographic challenge for Generation Y.I am not like them!If we look closely at these two cohorts, there are actually more similarities than differences. Although the generational markers (formative events during the teen and early adult years that members of a cohort share) are significantly different, both were raised in an affluent society. Both cohorts are self-indulgent, independent and self-reliant. Both are highly educated and believe in hard work. Both expect access to the career ladder and expect their skills and knowledge to be recognized and their contribution rewarded. So if they are really not that different, why does the demographic challenge exist?Because perception is reality. Boomers perceive Generation Y as demanding with unrealistic expectations about their role in the workplace. Boomers respect authority and value the hierarchical nature of most organizations – work hard, do your time, get results and you will be rewarded with promotion. Generation Y questions authority and wants to make their own choices – get an education, excel at technology, expect more from your employer, work hard and you will be rewarded with promotion at a fast pace. Generation Y’s perception of Boomers is one of a financially driven group- both as employees and consumers. They view Boomer managers as authoritarian and not open to change. Boomers question Generation Y’s penchant to spend working time on social media sites and expecting to be able to bring their personal smartphones to work and use them for both work and personal applications. As Boomers stay in the workforce and delay retirement, Generation Y feels potential jobs and promotions are denied to them.So what can we do to address these perceptions and bring Boomer Managers and Generation Y employees closer together – to get both cohorts focused on working together for professional and personal performance growth? Here are three steps that members of both cohorts can apply – leveraging the similarities and reducing the effect of their differences. Educate yourself to minimize erroneous perceptions and develop an appreciation for members of the other cohort. Boomer managers need to invest time and effort to fully understand the preferences and working styles of Generation Y. This will provide them with important information when seeking to create an environment where current employees are retained and future employees are recruited. Boomers should take this opportunity to learn about the differences, how to work with them, how to incorporate them into their role as leaders. The Boomer ‘leadership’ philosophy, if based in change management concepts,will set the stage and provide the tools they need to develop future leaders and keep expertise within the organization.Generation Y employees or recruitment candidates should invest time and effort in not only raising their awareness of the organization but also, awareness of those who lead and manage the organization. Developing an awareness for the skills, knowledge and experience acquired by Boomers over their many years of service, will provide Generation Y with the information they need to determine who, in the organization, is best positioned to help them learn and grow. Generation Y are interested in organizations that encourage growth and development of their employees, so they should be seeking out those types of organizations and determining how best to mine the expertise of the Boomer managers in those organizations.
Get to Know One Another – it’s all about building relationships. Boomers are considered to be the ultimate networkers. They have developed a considerable network of professional and personal contacts both within the profit and not for profit sectors. They favour face to face interaction and communication and through this vehicle they have learned how to build lasting relationships, understanding the value of relationships to grow the customer base and grow the business. Surely they could apply this knowledge and expertise to building relationships with members of Generation Y. Generation Y may be new to the concept of networking, as implemented by Boomers, but they certainly know how to network online and build a community of like-minded people. The line between their personal and professional communities are blurred so they don’t tend to differentiate between who is in their specific community. They are also pack-oriented, preferring to play and work within a team or group. So relationships, to them, are also key. The difference may only be in the manner in which they build these relationships. By getting to know one another and how they like to work, most likely these two cohorts will find they are both good at building relationships and share their best practices.
Build a Mentoring Partnership – what are your skills and knowledge you can share with another? Mentoring is an investment of time and effort but it is also best when both parties have something substantial in common such as an interest in a particular skill, position or knowledge area. The key to an effective mentor relationship is that both parties need to be getting something out of the relationship. Reverse mentoring or social-techno mentoring – where Boomers are mentored in the technological skills and knowledge held by Generation Y and Generation Y are mentored in management and leadership skills and knowledge held by Boomers – will take both cohorts a long way to building the relationships necessary to destroy the stereotypes.

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To best understand our current workplace environment and predict future trends, it is necessary to ‘lump’ members of generations into groups defined by their generational markers. We can not look, as leaders, researchers, evaluators of trends, or predictors of the future, only at individuals. We have to generalize and these generalizations can lead to stereotyping groups of people. If the generational cohorts in the workplace take the time and effort to get to know one another, their skills, knowledge and expertise, and be open to sharing their ideas with other cohorts, then the ongoing demographic challenge between Boomers and Generation Y should turn into an ongoing opportunity to build productive relationships.

Red Manhood Protection From Cold Weather

Now that cold weather is blowing through, winter is definitely here. While even warm weather aficionados can find some things about the cold they like (hot chocolate, roaring fires, an excuse to stay inside and binge watch), it’s equally true that even cold weather fans can find drawbacks. And for men, that includes getting a red manhood from freezing temperatures and bitter icy winds. Finding ways to keep the member sufficiently warm during these winter months is part of good male organ care.

Red manhood

Now, there’s usually nothing wrong with a red manhood. Men who are fair-skinned tend to get a red manhood when it becomes firm, as the blood rushing into the engorged member causes a change in coloration. But sometimes a red manhood can signal a problem, such as being far too cold.

Anyone who has ever jumped into a pool of cold water has witnessed a cold red manhood � and one that is usually shriveled. But when the male organ is exposed to extreme cold temperatures for a prolonged time, it may actually get a little swollen and can experience extreme pain.

In some severe cases, a red manhood may be an indication of frostbite (or frostnip, an early stage condition of frostbite). Frostbite is accompanied by a numbness (lack of feeling or deadened feeling), swelling, blistering and fever, although not all men may experience all of these symptoms. If a man suspects he has a frostbitten member or other body part, he should seek medical attention. Severe frostbite can destroy tissue and in extreme cases may lead to amputation.

Keeping warm

To help fight that winter cold, there are several ways to keep the manhood warm during the winter.

�Don’t go commando. First and foremost, men who habitually walk around without underwear should suspend that habit when venturing out into winter weather. The cold weather can be too dangerous to male organ health, no matter how nice the feeling of freedom may be.

�Stand in front of a fire. Spending a few minutes in front of a fireplace can help warm up a member so it withstands the cold better during its first minutes outside.

�Give the member a rub. Similarly, taking a couple of minutes to rub and massage the manhood before tackling the cold can be beneficial. This will get the blood circulating and help deflect the initial cold.

�Tuck it in. If he is only going to be outside for a few minutes, a guy can try tucking his manhood between his legs for extra warmth. However, since it will pop out relatively quickly, this is a very short term solution.

�Layer up. Doubling up on underwear is strongly advised. Just as a guy may wear a shirt, sweater and coat to combat the cold, so should he consider wearing more than one pair of underwear. The bottom layer should be tight briefs, an athletic supporter or compression shorts, each of which will fit the male organ more snugly.

�Go thermal. It can also help to wear thermal underwear, which may add an extra layer of warmth to the region.

�Investigate wind briefs. Many runners wear wind briefs, specially designed underwear with an extra layer of protection in the midsection.

�Wear a member warmer. A man can invest in an actual knitted member warmer � or simply wear a (clean) sock over the organ when temperatures get frosty.

Taking steps to prevent a red manhood due to cold weather pays off. So does taking steps to ensure overall male organ health, such as regularly applying a top drawer male organ health crme (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). For best results, a guy should select a crme that is going to �cover all the bases� by including the major vitamins necessary for member health promotion � A, B5, C, D and E. In addition, the crme should include L-arginine, an amino acid which helps manhood blood vessels expand so they can accommodate a greater flow of blood.

Management and Leadership – What’s the Difference Then?

Truth is, both are pretty important. Although we might try to distinguish between them and aim to get them into a neat little descriptive package, it can be quite a challenge.Leaders or Managers – What’s The Most ValuableLeadership is a quality, which is undeniably useful for the eventual benefit of the company, management is the crucial, integral activity that will ensure it survives today, by ensuring the company delivers it’s operational requirements, thereby ensuring the possibility of seeing a tomorrow at all.Leadership can be described as ‘that quality which involves innovation, risk taking and exploring of new avenues’ for the company to secure a stable, unchallenged superior position in a competitive world.From this it could be considered that in a constant and steady state, all an organization consistently needs is solid management skills to survive, without any need for leadership skills. Leaders in any organization are the seeds sown for health and success in the future.

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Managers Focus On Today’s PerformancePerformanceTo manage well is to focus on ongoing activities. Since the aim of management is to maximize profits using available resources, any good manager should be able to motivate and encourage his or her people. They should have the ability to initiate the workers, any company’s main assets, into an inspired state of working, to get them pulling together in order to achieve a common goal.It is only when managers are accomplishing results, through the co-operation of their workers that a company will be able to flourish. This is why a manager has to have the keen ability to gauge his workforce’s needs and act accordingly.If his workers are capable and have adequate skill then the manager merely has to motivate and encourage them towards progress. If, on the other hand, the workforce is not that accomplished, the manager’s task is to personally guide and instruct them in order for them to benefit.Get Management Right And Then Focus On LeadershipSo, since utilizing and distributing resources is what is demanded from the manager, he cannot afford to be overly authoritarian. If he is, then he may push his workers into being less productive. Instead he should be the friendly but firm guide who inspires dedication to a common end.Any manager’s goal is to maximize resources and reap the highest results, while dealing efficiently with clients and their quirks (as well as employees). So while leadership focuses on taking companies onto new directions and give them new visions and aims, good managers help inspire employees deliver results in the shorter term in a focused way.This helps the company to consistently reap profits right now, maintaining stability and equilibrium, so providing a healthy environment for the longer term potential the leader seeks to unleash. So a good manager will know how to handle stakeholders, clients and workers with equal ease, keeping things moving along nicely.

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Then The Leader Comes AlongBecause a manager is interacting so intimately with all parties, he or she will instinctively have knowledge of what clicks, who should be made to work together with whom and how to deal with problems.But while a manager by virtue of the nature of his work has to be an insider, working closely at the sharp-end of the business every day, the leader does not. He can work from the sidelines and inspire change without even having a personal stake in what’s happening today.Leadership is needed for future growth and development in any business. It is a strategic activity, requiring vision, creativity and market-wisdom. Management is what gets work done; what brings today’s cash-flow and ensures the health of the business right now and in the foreseeable future.It is the true force and inspiration behind any successful organization, without which, there would be no future.